Who is this mystery man?

Who is this mystery man? I don’t know who he is, I don’t know where he lives, I don’t know his name. But I do know where he came from.

Well let’s just say this, I know where his photo came from.

Late last year, I decided to try to attempt a new medium: oil. I was not terribly pleased with my first oil portrait, which is why you are not seeing it here! But I discovered that I learned a lot.

You see, I am “about” learning. I think learning is incredibly healthy, it develops a vibrancy of the soul and heart. I believe learning incorporates so much more than the mind. For me, learning involves the passionate pursuit of something new, exciting, interesting.

Learning develops courage muscles! Which is why I chose this mystery man’s photograph for my second oil portrait.

harry the man 1

I chose to paint him because his eyes, the shadows, the light on his face–all three of these components intrigued me.

I am constantly amazed at what attracts people to a work of art. Is it the subject–landscape, still life, portraits, interiors, architectural buildings? Maybe the color–mauve, patriot blue, lime green, gorgeous orange? Is it the technique or medium–watercolor, thick, chunky palette knife, acrylic abstract splashes?

I find that sometimes what attracts me to paint something is not what attracts the viewer. Though this is not always the case.

Much to my surprise, this man’s face drew lots of comments!! Everything from, “I love his eyes,” to “he’s just too intense for me,” or “he’s a handsome man,” and even “I don’t like him at all!” Oh dear, I had no idea the range of responses I would get! I just wanted to challenge myself, and I did!

The eyes were tough as you can see in the next picture.

harry the man 2

The nose was tough, and as an added bonus, the beard was a challenge too! What a painting experience he turned out to be. At least in painting, you don’t really discover how much you’ve learned until you’ve started a new painting, or completed it.

Since I didn’t know this man’s name (I got his photo off a free photo site that allows you to paint what’s posted.) I called him “Harry”. Do not ask me why, he looked like a “Harry” to me; and I couldn’t really keep calling him “Mystery Man”. However, if anyone recognizes this gentleman and does know his name, I’d love to see what he thinks of my painting!

Here is the finished portrait, my second one in oil. I hope I conveyed the essence of what I see in him. Harry is one of a kind and so are you!

Harry the man 3

We are exceptionally unique and designed in the Creator’s image. Therefore the Creator God must be ever so fascinating as He has so many facets. “I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well.” Psalm 129:14 ESV Never forget how special you are to Him and remember you are one of His works!

Please send me your comments and thoughts on my no longer a mystery man, “Harry”!

 

Go ahead...share the encouragement
Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Small but Memorable

Art museums may not be high on your list of places to visit with small children. I can understand that. We’ve heard an annoyed “shhhhh” from more than one art museum docent in our years with small ones in tow. But sometimes, small children and small art museums make for big memories!

We are Bank of America card holders, so we have the opportunity to enjoy a free museum on the first weekend of every month as part of their “Museums on Us” program. Being new to Orlando, we thought this would be a great opportunity to try out a new museum. This month, we selected the Mennello Museum of American Art.

The museum itself is small, only one floor with a few carefully chosen exhibits, both permanent and rotating. However, it sits on a beautiful expanse of land along the shores of Lake Formosa in downtown Orlando. We were also able to wander through its well manicured gardens which are amply supplied with comfy adirondack chairs for lounging, and engaging sculptures to enjoy.

small 1

No small sculptures

Currently, they are featuring the sculptures of Alice Aycock – Waltzing Matilda and Twin Vortexes. These sculptures are anything but small. My daughters were fascinated just by walking around them and noting all the various details. As they viewed the sculptures from different angles, they pointed out different features and had lively discussions about what the sculptor was creating.

small 2

There are a variety of other sculptures to view along the pathways in the garden. My family was particularly delighted with the larger than life crayon sculpture.

small 3

No small impact

Inside the museum, we noticed that we had arrived on the final weekend of the visiting exhibit The Beautiful Mysterious: The Extraordinary Gaze of William EgglestonEggleston’s photographs have shaped many in the art world beyond just photographers. American novelist Megan Abbott said, “To me, his photographs evoke entire worlds, not worlds we merely see, but worlds we feel, smell, touch…When you look long enough at his photographs, [like the gorgeous, lonely blue parking lot chosen as one of the exhibit’s central images] you get lost in it. You’re in another place.”

small 4
Art credit: William Eggleston, Untitled, 1973, color photograph. Collection of the University of Mississippi Museum and Historic Houses, gift of Dr. William R. Ferris.

Indeed, even our small children were in another place as they walked slowly and quietly through the exhibit. Ordinary moments in time become extraordinary works of art. In ways that I cannot quite explain, Eggleston’s works were remarkable in their power to capture my attention and my imagination with scenes as pedestrian as laundry hanging on a clothesline.

small 5
Art credit: William Eggleston, Untitled, color photograph. Collection of the University of Mississippi Museum and Historic Houses, gift of Dr. William R. Ferris.

My girls were full of big questions about the photos and why they were so powerful. They began creating whole stories around the snapshot moments captured and displayed on the walls of this small exhibit. Unfortunately, the exhibit has moved on, but I would encourage you to check out the works of this groundbreaking artist.

The Mennello Museum also has permanent exhibits featuring self-taught landscape artist Earl Cunningham, and a fascinating sculpture by Albert Paley, entitled Hector. 

small 6
art credit: Albert Paley (b. Philadelphia, PA 1944), Hector, 1990, steel with red paint. Collection of The Mennello Museum of American Art, purchased by Friends of The Mennello Museum of American Art, 2016, from Paley Studios Archive, Rochester, NY

This towering steel sculpture calls to mind the character of Hector from Homer’s Iliad. My husband has had the pleasure of teaching the Iliad and my daughter has read a children’s version of it as well. We had a rather interesting and engaging discussion about Hector the Greek hero and the sculpture.

No small stories

We spent not quite two hours exploring the Mennello museum, both inside and out. I’m so glad we took the opportunity to visit. I have no doubt that we will return. The museum offers multiple opportunities to engage with the art they celebrate. They offer free docent led tours on the first Friday of every month, a monthly free day for families (where your small ones can create their own art), a monthly documentary movie screening, and even a puppet led story time for toddlers.

I was thrilled to find a museum that was accessible, engaging, and thought provoking to enjoy with my whole family. Even my six year old has asked if we can return! But you don’t have to be small to appreciate the Mennello. My husband and I were grateful for the opportunity to be exposed to some new-to-us artists and look forward to our next visit.

If you’re in the Orlando area, I would encourage you to check out the Mennello Museum. If you’re not, I have a hunch that you have your own small museum in town. Maybe you’ve always overlooked it because of it’s size. You may just find something there you never expected. What’s your favorite small museum you’ve explored? Share your experiences in the comments, I’m always looking for new places to see!

 

Go ahead...share the encouragement
Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Cluck, Cluck, Collecting

I love pallet knife painting and I love chickens! Fortunately for me I have a friend who loves collecting and appreciates both! Sunny, is the third rooster I’ve completed and she was fun. Sometimes it’s just a good idea to focus on something fun.

collecting 1

If you’ve been listening to the news lately, it’s easy to get down, the woes of the world are many. So I’m going to recommend one of the little pleasures in life, collecting.

The joy of collecting

It’s funny when you talk to some people about collecting things, often he or she will just say, “I don’t know how I started collecting x,y,z, but it just grew. I started to see paintings, ceramics, drawings all around me. Friends started to bring me items and my collection just kept expanding.”

When you start to notice something, it does seem like it’s all around you. Everywhere you turn. If you decide you want to buy a RAM truck then all you start to see on the road are those trucks! There’s even a name for it – the Baader-Meinhof phenomenon.

Half the fun of collecting is displaying all your treasures. Sunny, my latest rooster will be displayed with the other two roosters, I’ve done. If you haven’t seen them, take a look, on my collectors page. I think you’ll agree that Sunny will be a fitting addition to the group. Additionally, I was able to customize Sunny, so to speak, by highlighting the blues and yellows, colors in my friend’s kitchen where she has the other two rooster paintings featured.

Perhaps it’s time for you to start something fun and a collection might be right up your alley! My husband is now collecting Red Pandas!

collecting 2

What are you collecting?

How about a collecting various 8 x 10 sunsets or a series of sunflowers? Or maybe peppers for someone in your family that likes “hot and spicy”. A collection of paintings as your grandchild grows up, there are many possibilities. If you like roosters then you can always get a few prints  or a mug to kick off your collection. Even better, I’ll be happy to create a custom rooster for you!

It’s good to focus on that which makes us happy, something Sunny! Something to take your mind off tragedy, disasters, disease. I’m not minimizing those things, but we can enjoy the temporary, while keeping our eyes on the eternal too.

Jesus said that we would have trouble, but He is our Overcomer. So enjoy all that His hand has given and set your mind on things above where He is seated in the heavenlies.

collecting 3

What are you collecting? Are you interested in starting a new collection? Let me know your thoughts.

 

Go ahead...share the encouragement
Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone